11 Pages Your WordPress Site Needs That You’ve Never Thought Of

Okay, so you have your About page, your Blog listing page, your Contact page.

Done. Right?

Or … maybe you could take the game further and include some other pages that aren’t as obvious?

Let’s find out!

Here’s a quick list of 11 pages that your WordPress site might need that you’ve never thought of … probably.

And, of course, feel free to pick and choose whatever makes sense for the kind of WordPress site that you’re building right now. Business sites have different needs than traditional blogs, for example.

1. Income Report / Traffic Report

Those pages have gained a lot of popularity lately.

The most famous reports out there are Pat Flynn’s and John Lee Dumas’:

entrepreneuronfire

Basically, this sort of report is meant to showcase the site owner’s progress in their niche and introduce some transparency into their operations (more on transparency in a minute).

As it turns out, income reports often end up being one of the most popular pages on the websites that publish them. People are just naturally curious about those things.

How to build it:

  • The are two parts to this task: 1) You have to build a hub page – a page that links to the previous reports. Then, 2) you need pages for individual reports. That second part can also be done via blog posts.
  • Standard page template will do its job as the hub page.

2. Transparency Report

We first started publishing transparency reports back in March 2015. We were truly fascinated by what the Buffer team was doing and the amount of detail that they were willing to share (and still are).

buffer

Our goal was to simply talk about what’s going on behind the scenes at CodeinWP business-wise. Right now (some months later), the transparency reports are ones of the most commented posts on the blog. We also believe that they provide good insight to people in similar lines of business who might be dealing with similar challenges.

Either way, transparency reports are a great way to connect with your audience on a more personal level and share some of the behind-the-scenes details.

How to build it:

  • Each report should cover the most important goings-on. Talk about the challenges you’re facing, your results, your experiments. Basically, everything that’s a piece of interesting behind-the-scenes info.
  • Ongoing themes. For instance, apart from individual stories, Ionut always shares a revenue breakdown for the previous month. Whatever it is in your case, make it consistent.
  • A lesson. Try providing clear takeaway lessons in your reports. The reports shouldn’t be entirely about you, but also point out how the audience can learn from your experiences.
  • You can publish the reports either as standard WordPress posts or pages.

3. Consulting

A must-have type of page for businesses offering any consulting services, obviously.

Under the hood, it can be a standard sales page, but the “item” on sale is a very specific kind of service.

Consulting is often difficult to sell because there’s no direct graspable result of the service. At the end of the day, it’s copywriting and good design that play a key role in establishing the business’ credibility and making the offer attractive.

A great example of a well-designed consulting page comes from Neil Patel and his personal site:

Neil2

Neil uses a handful of clever elements to sell his consulting service. For instance, he presents a proof that his methods work. He does this by displaying numbers, logos of companies he’s worked with and testimonials. Then, there’s the design of the page itself, which is very catchy yet simple and professional. Lastly, there’s an integrated booking mechanism that allows the visitor to schedule a consulting session right away.

How to build it:

  • Having a booking mechanism is especially important for a consulting page. One of the best plugins offering this sort of thing is called Appointments (free).
  • When it comes to the structure of the page, you can try mimicking Neil and going for a custom-designed modular layout.

4. Speaking

Similar to a consulting page, but this time it’s about hiring the person/business for a speaking appearance.

Here’s an example of a speaking page by Josh Shipp – a recognized teen expert, TV personality and author:

joshshipp

How to build it:

  • From a technical point of view, this can be a standard WordPress page or a custom modular page like the consulting page mentioned above.
  • An integrated contact form should also find its place on the page, so the visitors interested in the offer can reach out right away.

pirate-forms

5. FAQ

Since the visitors are likely to ask certain questions repeatedly, then why not provide them with some ready-made answers?

How to build it:

  • The first option is to build such a page by hand, on top of a standard page template.
  • The alternative is to use a plugin like Ultimate FAQ.

faq

6. Guest blogging guidelines

Depending on the site you’re building, and especially if it’s an online magazine, a lot of people will start reaching out about guest blogging opportunities once the site becomes authoritative enough in its niche.

Having a page meant to give those people basic information about the guidelines is a good idea. More than that, having this sort of page is an equally good idea even if the site doesn’t accept guest bloggers (in that case, it can be used to simply state that guest contributions are not a possibility at the time).

This works for a simple reason. Picture this: someone researches guest blogging possibilities on the site > finds the guidelines page > sees that no guests are allowed, so they don’t reach out with a pitch. The end.

If the site does allow guest contributions, on the other hand, then the page should state the rules of getting in and all the steps necessary.

Tip. If you want to see if someone has read your guidelines before pitching, on the guidelines page itself, say that every pitch needs to mention a certain safe-word (something that’s not obvious, like “Aston Martin”). And that if it doesn’t, the pitch will be discarded.

How to build it:

  • Standard WordPress page template will do.

7. Partnerships / affiliate program

Similarly to a “hire me” page, the main value of a Partnerships page is that it attracts partners partly because of its sole existence. Of course, good copy is crucial too, like with most types of pages.

A Partnerships page should present a summary of what the business is doing in its niche and what sort of partnerships they’re looking for.

For affiliate programs, the page should go into even more detail and talk about things like commissions, the results that affiliates can expect, how to get started, why this affiliate program is better than the others and why anyone should join.

Two examples; the first one comes from Paid to Exist:

paidtoexist

And the other one from ThemeIsle:

themeisle

How to build it:

  • Can be a standard WordPress page template. Usually sans the sidebar.
  • Contact form or signup form integrated on the page.

8. Podcast / YouTube channel

If the business behind the website has a podcasting element as part of their content offering then it’s a good idea to showcase it on a separate page.

Here’s an example by Michael O’Neal:

solopreneurhour

Nothing fancy, just a listing of all the episodes along with links pointing to individual sub-pages devoted to single episodes. Direct links to the podcast’s iTunes page and RSS feed are a must too.

How to build it:

  • Standard WordPress page template.
  • Custom category listing for “podcasts.”

9. Books

The purpose of the Books page is to simply recommend the best publications on a given topic.

No matter what niche the website’s in, there’s certainly a number of books that the visitor could/should be interested in – sort of a must-read set of books for the niche.

Additionally, this page gives you an opportunity of earning some extra income by referring people to Amazon where they can buy the actual books.

How to build it:

  • Use a full-width page template.
  • Pick 5-10 books and get your embed codes from Amazon.
  • Don’t forget about some form of an affiliate disclosure – letting people know that what they see are affiliate links.

10. Shop

Is there anything that you want to sell directly from the website? If so, build an e-commerce store that’s integrated with the website itself.

These days, you can use WooCommerce (plugin) to do the heavy lifting. It also takes care of the presentation – giving you access to the most effective e-commerce layouts.

woocommerce

How to build it:

11. Advertising

The Advertising page is meant to present the advertising options available on the website, along with all the info that a potential advertiser might be interested in.

For example, here’s a page used by Entrepreneurs-Journey.com:

entrepreneurs-journey

Very simple presentation, with just the basic info on it. In fact, you don’t need anything else. No fancy graphics or anything. The advertisers won’t be interested in that anyway.

How to build it:

  • Again, a standard page template will do.
  • Include things like: monthly page views or other traffic stats, available ad placements and campaign types, how to get started (preferably a contact form embedded in the page itself).

Your turn

What other pages do you like to include in your WordPress sites that might not be as obvious? Feel free to share in the comments.

Karol K

Creates content, manages CodeinWP's team of writers and makes sure that every piece of content you see on this blog looks great! / Author of "WordPress Complete" / Professional yerba mate drinker / @carlosinho
  • Blake O’Ruairi

    1 – Unsubscribe page thats prominently available if you have a mailing list at work; dont make me hunt for it
    2 – “Connect” page, listing you/your site’s social media pages directly; maybe I just want to see what else you post, and not ‘like’ or ‘follow’ anything
    3 – A “normal” contact form as well as all others; Yes, you need a ‘get a quote’ or ‘book online here’ form to build your business and they do work, but you also need a straight forward ‘Contact’ form – not everyone wants a Quote, or to Book things
    4 – Partners Page=if you exclusively or solely use a specific company in your business, then having info and links -always links – to those prominent partners will help your site and add Trust value to what you offer by bringing on those big guns i.e. plumber using only Whirlpool products, get a page on them up and link to them directly. Trust sells, and I may not recognise your company name, but if I know the company who’s products you supply, I’m more likely to use you than a no name brand

    Just my own thoughts, but i know they help and work~.

    • Great ideas, I had never thought of a Partners page, and we’re partners with some great companies!

    • Thanks for sharing, Blake! Some good ideas!

      Re:
      2 – That’s a great idea.
      3 – I can relate to that. I particularly don’t enjoy contacting people with standard requests via support tickets.

      • Blake O’Ruairi

        Hi Karol,

        I think the reason #2 rings well with people is that it act’s like a trust factor = I see you’ve been posting cats in bread pics on Twitter for over 4 years, so I know your not some scammer setup last week type (even if i hate cats). If you see what I mean.

        • That makes sense. Your prior behavior on social media is perhaps the best indication of how “real” you are.

    • Great page ideas. I’ll definitely incorporate some into my blog. 😉

  • Gary

    That’s such a good blog post, I’ve never seen it before. I’ve bookmarked it. Other pages you could talk about in a follow up article are linking policy – not everybody wants to exchange links with every site… in short, not all are trusted sites. There was a time when webmasters were being blasted by emails for link requests. perhaps they still are. Comments policy might be another good one.

    • Indeed, they still are. A “linking policy” page is an interesting idea.

  • Blake O’Ruairi

    @ Andrea Gatley – glad it sparked an idea for you, that’s really what Comments sections are all about~

  • How about Terms of Service page? I just shared this page with my students in the bi-weekly call. They loved it. I do, too.

    • Terms of Service is a good idea. It’s one of those things that no one really reads but should be on most sites.

  • Michael Ryan

    Privacy Policy

  • Rates. A lot of folks (and theme devs) are cranking out pre-made “Good, Better, Best” prices (always three options!) but they are rarely helpful in decision-making. They’re just nice tables with the center one always listed as the “best value” to the customer. How about actual rates tables that explain how you charge for services. Better still, add a comparison to your competition to show why you may be charging a higher premium.

    • That’s an interesting idea. But aren’t you afraid that giving customers too many options could lead to choice paralysis?